Clock Representing Automatic Time Extensions

Tentative Map Automatic Time Extensions Explained

Five bills have been passed to grant tentative map automatic time extensions. Those bills are (in order):

  1. Senate Bill (SB) 1185
  2. Assembly Bill (AB) 333
  3. AB 208
  4. AB 116
  5. AB 1303

Each of these bills granted extensions to tentative tract maps approved by one given date that would have expired before another given date. Let’s go through the bills one by one so we can break down the legalese into something easier to digest.

  1. SB 1185

SB 1185 grants a 12-month time extension to any tentative tract or parcel map approved before July 15, 2008 that had not expired on July 15, 2008, and would have otherwise expired before January 1, 2011.

In other words, SB 1185 extends your tentative map’s expiration date by 12 months if all the following criteria are met:

  • The tentative map’s approval date is before July 15, 2008
  • The tentative map’s expiration date is later than July 15, 2008
  • The tentative map’s expiration date is earlier than January 1, 2011

The next two bills use the same criteria with different dates and a longer extension. You could actually just plug in the applicable dates for AB 333 and AB 208 for the criteria above to see if either bill applies. But we’ll go through them just to nail the concept in.

  1. AB 333

AB 333 grants a 24-month extension to any tentative tract or parcel map approved before July 15, 2009, that hadn’t expired on July 15, 2009, and would have otherwise expired before January 1, 2012.

So, AB 333 extends your tentative map’s expiration date by 24 months if the following criteria are met:

  • The tentative map’s approval date is before July 15, 2009
  • The tentative map’s expiration date is later than July 15, 2009
  • The tentative map’s expiration date is earlier than January 1, 2012
  1. AB 208

AB 208 grants a 24-month automatic state extension to any tentative tract or parcel map approved prior to July 15, 2011, that had not expired on July 15, 2011, and would have otherwise expired prior to January 1, 2014.

So, AB 208 extends your tentative map’s expiration date by 24 months if the following criteria are met:

  • The tentative map’s approval date is before July 15, 2011
  • The tentative map’s expiration date is later than July 15, 2011
  • The tentative map’s expiration date is earlier than January 1, 2014

You may have noticed that for the first three bills, the only thing that changes are the dates.  The language of the criteria is the same. AB 116 and AB 1303 are a little different, but even easier to understand.

  1. AB 116

AB 116 grants a 24-month extension to any tentative tract or parcel map approved on or after January 1, 2000 that didn’t expire on or before July 11, 2013.

AB 116 extends your tentative map’s expiration date by 24 months if the following criteria are met:

  • Approval date is January 1, 2000 or later
  • Expiration date is earlier than July 11, 2013
  1. AB 1303

AB 1303 grants a 24-month extension to any tentative tract or parcel map approved on or after January 1, 2002 but not later than July 11, 2013.

AB 1303 extends your tentative map’s expiration date by 24 months if the following criteria are met:

  • Approval date is January 1, 2002 or later
  • Approval date is earlier than July 11, 2013

AB 1303 is only applicable to counties in which the following criteria apply:

  • Annual mean household income in the county is less than 80% of the statewide annual mean
  • The county’s annual non-seasonal unemployment rate is at least 2.75% higher than the statewide annual non-seasonal unemployment rate.
  • The poverty rate within the county’s population is at least 4% higher than the statewide median poverty rate.

Important note on Tentative Tract Map Expiration Dates

Remember that when one of the tentative map automatic extensions is applied to your map, the map gets a new expiration date. This may affect the applicability of other tentative map automatic extensions.

For example, if SB 1185 is applicable to your map, you must add 12 months to your original expiration date. Then you evaluate whether AB 333 is applicable with that new expiration date.

However, if you use the tentative tract map calculator, that’s all figured out for you.